A firewall review: OutPost vs Peerblock Comparison

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outpost firewall vs peerblock firewall graphic

 

Outpost vs PeerBlock – A Firewall Comparison

Following our previous firewall comparison articles, today we are going to compare Outpost vs PeerBlock to help you find the best Internet security software for your computer.

As cyberattacks get more widespread and common every day, it is becoming more and more vital to set up a trustworthy firewall for any computer that is connected to the Internet. A firewall is a security system that monitors incoming and outgoing traffic of the network and blocks any data that is considered dangerous or unauthorized according to its security rules.

A firewall can be hardware, software, or a combination of both. Outpost and PeerBlock are both software firewalls, but they have different applications and features.

 

PeerBlock history

PeerBlock is a fork of PeerGuardian, a free and open-source personal firewall that was released by Phoenix Labs (formerly Methlabs) in 2003. PeerGuardian is optimized for peer-to-peer file-sharing networks, like BitTorrent. In 2009, Mark Bulas and his team of few developers created PeerBlock 1.0 based on PeerGuardian 2. Not so long after that, the Windows version of PeerGurdian was discontinued, and Phoenix Labs encouraged its users to migrate to PeerBlock as the Windows successor to PeerGuardian.

The latest version of PeerBlock is PeerBlock 1.2 which was released in 2014. Since the software has not had any new version for the past six years, many consider it discontinued.

Outpost history

Outpost firewall was developed by Agnitum, a computer security company based in St. Petersburg, Russia. The founders, Mikhail Zakhryapin and Alexei Elagin were students at Baltic State Technical University, back in 1999 when they started Agnitum.

In 2002, Agnitum released the first version of the Outpost Firewall, which soon gained much international popularity and became the company’s most valuable product. In the following years, the Russian company improved the Outpost firewall with several new versions and added various helpful components, such as antivirus, antispam, proactive protection, and host intrusion prevention system (HIPS), to the product.

Outpost 9.3 was the final version of Outpost which was released in December 2015 and included many great features, including a cloud-based analyzer. A short while after its release, Yandex, a Russian firm that owns the most popular general-purpose search engine in Russia, acquired Agnitum and announced that it planned to use Agnitum’s resources to improve the security of the Yandex web browser.

As a result, in 2016, Agnitum officially discontinued its antivirus base updates, bug fixing, technical support, and stopped distribution of its Outpost products. A year later, Agnitum shut down its website and user forum, as well.

 

peerblock firewall ui

Platform compatibility

PeerBlock is compatible with Microsoft Windows 8, Windows 7, Vista, and Windows XP on both 32-bit and 64-bit setups. Outpost firewall can be used on the same Windows versions, plus Windows 10. PeerBlock 1.2 firewall also has a portable edition, which can be used without installation and does not store data on the system. Neither PeerBlock, nor Outpost firewall is compatible with macOS or Linux.

 

Outpost Firewall Pro

Peerblock

PC

·          32/64 bit  versions of Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, 10

·         does not support any server

·         32/64-bit  version of Windows Vista, 7, 8

·         does not support any server

Mobile

-

-

 

License and Price

In terms of price, no side has much advantage in the Outpost vs PeerBlock contest.

Outpost used to have a paid version as well as a free version with limited features. But, now that its official distribution has been stopped, purchasing the full version is no longer possible, but you can still download the free edition.

PeerBlock is free, but accessing its updated blocklists may require paying a fee. To provide users with updated blocklists, PeerBlock used to use I-Blocklist, a website dedicated to provide unlimited free list updating. But since 2015, I-Blocklist no longer offers free updates for blocklists.

In 2017, the Peerblocklist website started sharing free blocklists for PeerBlock and PeerGuardian users. But the free part ended in 2019, when the website started asking for a monthly subscription fee to allow access to all blocklists.

To sum up, even though PeerBlock is probably discontinued just like Outpost, but unlike Outpost, PeerBlock users still receive some sort of update against new threats. It may not be as efficient as a new version, but it is better than not getting any up-to-date protection.

 

Outpost Firewall Pro

Peerblock

License

Freeware

Freeware (GPL)

Price range

It is completely free

It is completely Free

Multi-devices

-

No

Free trial

It is completely free

It is completely Free

Money-back guarantee

It is completely free

It is completely Free

 

outpost pro ui

What is PeerBlock?

Rather than a normal personal firewall, PeerBlock is an advanced IP blocking tool that can be especially helpful for heavy torrent users. PeerBlock’s main function is to block incoming and outgoing connections to and from specific IP addresses and IP ranges. It has a default built-in list of IP addresses, including some government-related websites, anti-P2P organizations, educational institutions, and universities, as well as spyware websites. Blocking educational institutions could be helpful for those using college networks, but would like to hide their Internet activity from their college staff. Anti-P2P organizations are usually media companies, who try to find individuals who share movie and music files on file-sharing networks, by constantly scanning torrenters and monitoring their online activities.

Additionally, if you have other unwanted IP ranges in mind, you can make your own blocklist to block, too. You can even block entire countries if you’d like to. PeerBlock also blocks most ads, by default.

The first time that you run PeerBlock, a wizard helps you through configuring your preferences which, can be changed later. For example, you should specify what you intend to block, in the beginning. There's also the “Always Allow HTTP” option that you can check to always enable connections over ports 80 and 443 of your system, even if they're on your blocklist. These two ports are generally associated with the Internet and web browsing, but other applications may need to access them, too.

As another option, PeerBlock users can choose to turn on or turn off both IP and HTTP trackers. PeerBlock also creates a log showing the time, source, IP address, destination, and protocol of the tracker.

 

What is Outpost?

Outpost is a two-way firewall, i.e. it monitors all the traffic coming in and out of your computer and make sure no inbound or outbound threat can put your system or data at risk. This way, Outpost can prevent hackers from accessing your system and stops malware that you might have on your system from connecting to the Internet and creating problems for you.

Outpost was created based on four major criteria: security, control, privacy, and ease of use. The security aspect included detecting malicious intruders, blocking data theft attempts, hiding your system from hackers through stealth mode, and watching your inbox for Internet worms and viruses. Control was about monitoring your network activity and providing a full report of connection history, as well as parental control options. Privacy was defined as preventing data leak, standing against the invasion of online privacy, and hiding your web surfing habits. Ease of use was achieved through auto-configures for your best protection during installation, as well as frequent updates. Of course, the latter is no longer relevant as the software is completely discontinued.

Outpost Firewall has pre-set rules for many popular applications (but naturally nothing for applications introduced after 2015, since it was discontinued after that.) How Outpost deals with new and unknown applications depends on the Firewall policy chosen by the user. For example, Outpost has a Block Most policy that if selected, gives Outpost Software a very suspicious attitude and makes it block all network connections from all applications except those that are explicitly allowed by the existing rules (including pre-set and user rules.) But the default policy that is active when the Outpost is first installed is called Rules Wizard that allows the user to determine whether an application should be allowed a network connection to a specific address and port, the first time that application is run. To that end, the Outpost firewall displays a prompt each time a new application or process (for which no rules are specified) requests network access or when an application requests a connection that is not covered by its existing rules.

outpost firewall is a Russian software

Outpost vs PeerBlock: Differences and Features

Here is a summary of features offered by Outpost and PeerBlock:

 

 

 

Outpost Firewall Pro

Peerblock

Supported Languages

English

English

Firewall

Yes

Yes

Including Antivirus

Yes

No

Identity Protection

Yes

No

Lock down mode

No

No

Internet Security

Yes

Yes

Early Boot Protection

No

No

 

When trying to choose a firewall, it is really important to know what you need and what is your purpose of getting a firewall. Here are a few points to think about while trying to take your pick in the Outpost vs PeerBlock battle:

  • Outpost is a general-purpose firewall and antivirus, which can be used by novices and advanced users, both. Of course, advanced users can take better advantage of complicated options, but it works well for ordinary Internet users, too. In contrast, PeerBlock is not for everyone. It is designed to be effective at monitoring and blocking IP addresses and is mainly used by heavy torrent users. PeerBlock does have a helpful “wizard” that can help you through the process, so you do not have to be a professional, but you need at least a basic understanding of IP addresses to use it.
  • Unlike Outpost, PeerBlock is open-source, so those familiar with coding may enjoy altering and enhancing its code according to their desire and needs. Thus, it is the winner in the Outpost vs PeerBlock race, in this aspect.
  • PeerBlock uses a very low amount of system resources, such as CPU and RAM. This is not the case with Outpost.

peerblock firewall

Conclusion

In this Outpost vs PeerBlock comparison, we discussed each firewall’s features and functionality. PeerBlock is a personal firewall specially designed for peer-to-peer file-sharing networks, whereas Outpost is a general-purpose Internet security package with many features and options. The catch is that Outpost was discontinued in 2015 and it is no longer supported by its manufacturer; that means it does not even get any virus database update. PeerBlock is believed to be discontinued too, since it has not had any new version in six years, but with PeerBlock, there are at least websites that provide PeerBlock users with up-to-date blocklists against malicious hosts and ad-servers. With that in mind, you can probably decide if you want to use PeerBlock, Outpost (not recommended), or neither. In case you think you need to consider other options, we recommend you read our other firewall comparison articles discussing Comodo, ZoneAlarm , TinyWall , GlassWire , etc.

Published by Blogger at 2020 May 31